tbjoin
 
 
Anasayfa
 
 
     
PBL-Tech Publications & Presentations
  • PIHNet
  • SSINet
  • General
 

The Impact of Teachers' Discussion Facilitation on High School Students' Ethical Reasoning

Jada Kohlmeier, John W. Saye

Paper will be presented at the 2016 AERA Conference, Washington, DC

 

The Impact of Discussion Facilitation on Ethical Reasoning

Jada Kohlmeier, John W. Saye

Paper will be presented at the 2015 CUFA Conference, New Orleans, LA

 

Promoting Problem-Based Historical Inquiry through Scaffolded Lessson Study

Jada Kohlmeier, John W. Saye, Theresa McCormick, James Howell, Colby Jones, David Shannon

Paper will be presented at the 2015 AERA Conference, Chicago, IL

 

The Persistent Issues in History Network: Using Technology to Support Historical Inquiry and Civic Reasoning

Social Education, Volume 69 Issue 3, April, 2005.

 

Supporting Learners in Technology-Enhanced Student-Centered Learning Environments

Lorna Uden, Thomas Brush

International Journal of Learning Technology, Volume 1 Issue 2, February 2004.

Abstract

Technology-enhanced student-centered learning environments provides learners with computer-based tools and resources to facilitate the completion of problem-based tasks. However, with TESCLEs, technology serves as a support and resources for students in their efforts to solve overarching authentic problems. Student success in these environments may be attributed to be types and amount of support they receive both from the environment and from the teacher. This paper will discuss different methods for providing students with support – defined as hard and soft scaffolding – and will provide examples of how these support are embedded into Decision Point!, a TESCLE focusing on the African-American civil rights movement that occurred in the USA in the 1960s.
 

Scaffolding Problem-Based Teaching in a Traditional Social Studies Classroom

John W. Saye, Thomas Brush

Theory & Research in Social Education, Volume 32 Issue 3, 2004.

Abstract

This paper explores whether a scaffolded, multimedia learning environment might mitigate obstacles that dissuade teachers from implementing problem-based practices. We present a longitudinal analysis of one expository-oriented teacher’s experience with such an environment and examine underlying belief, knowledge, and dispositional factors that may affect a teacher’s openness to inquiry. We hypothesize that work with such an environment may encourage reconsideration of some elements of teaching practice. However, those elements most closely related to dispositional influences may be more resistant to change than other features.
 

Promoting Civic Competence through Problem-based History Learning Experiments

John W. Saye, Thomas Brush

In G.E. Hamot, J.J. Patrick, & R.S. Leming (Eds). Civic Learning in Teacher Education, Volume 3 Issue 2, 2004.

Abstract

This paper presents a civic rationale for focusing pre-collegiate history study around enduring societal issues. We discuss the challenges that problem-based historical inquiry poses for teachers and learners. Finally, we describe and exemplify how a technology-supported learning environment can mitigate those challenges.

 

Scaffolding Critical Reasoning about History and Social Issues in Multimedia-Supported Learning Environments

John W. Saye, Thomas Brush

Educational Technology Research & Development, Volume 50 Issue 3, 2002.

Abstract

This article advances a continuing line of research that investigates the potential of hypermedia resources and scaffolding for supporting problem-based social studies and developing critical reasoning. Our findings suggest that expert guidance may be embedded into the learning environment to give students conceptual and strategic roadmaps that assist them in understanding the process of disciplined inquiry. However, our results also emphasize the difficulties in managing the cognitive challenges posed by ill-structured social problems and suggest limits to the embedded support that can be provided for complex thinking.

 

Implementation and Evaluation of a Student-Centered Learning Unit: A Case Study

Thomas Brush, John W. Saye

Educational Technology Research & Development, Volume 48 Issue 3, 2000.

Abstract

The purpose of this case study was to explore the issues involved in implementing a technology-enhanced student centered unit in order to provide recommendations to improve and enhance these types of learning activities. Results of this study suggest that a variety of factors impact the success or failure of student-centered activities, including student orientation to the unit problem, student collaboration, teacher management strategies, and student accountability mechanisms.
 

Student Engagement with Social Issues in a Multimedia-supported Learning Environment

John W. Saye, Thomas Brush

Theory & Research in Social Education, Volume 27 Issue 4, 1999.

Abstract

This paper explores high school students’ responses to a technology-supported, problem-based U.S. history unit. Findings suggest that scaffolded multimedia may provide a more authentic context for learning that raises student interest, confronts students with alternative perspectives, and makes knowledge more available for application to social problems.
 

Use of Mentoring to Improve Discussion Facilitation by Teachers

Jada Kohlmeier, John W. Saye

Paper will be presented at the 2014 AERA Conference, Philadelphia, PA

 

Scaffolded Lesson Study: Promoting Professional Teaching Knowledge for Problem-Based Historical Inquiry


John Saye, Jada Kohlmeier, Theresa McCormick, James Howell, Colby Jones, and David Shannon

Paper presented at the 2013 CUFA Conference, St. Louis, MO

Abstract


This report investigates the effects of scaffolded lesson study on the content knowledge, conceptions of curriculum, and classroom practice of 22 elementary and secondary teachers in 4 school districts. Teachers, teacher educators, and historians collaborated to design and test Research Lessons grounded in a theory-based framework for problem-based historical inquiry (PBHI) practice. Project participation was associated with significant gains in content knowledge and the conceptualization and implementation of intellectually challenging instruction consistent with the PBHI model. Evidence suggested that elementary teachers benefited even more than their secondary peers.

 

Ethical reasoning of high school seniors exploring issues of free speech

Jada Kohlmeier, John W. Saye

Paper presented at the 2012 CUFA Conference, Seattle, WA

Abstract

Because ethical decisions about what is fair or just are at the heart of most controversial issues in the public sphere, understanding how high school seniors reason ethically about conflictual democratic values is important. Teachers and teacher educators would be assisted in leading discussions if they know the ethical frameworks most often used by students and how the facilitator might encourage consideration of alternative ethical viewpoints. By creating a professional community of practice between four U.S. government teachers, a university researcher, and a political science professor, we asked high school seniors to discuss to what degree they agreed with the Supreme Court decision in Texas v. Johnson, which upheld flag burning as an expression of free speech. We were curious to know what ethical frameworks students used in wrestling with the value conflict in freedom of expression. We found all students used Kohlberg’s ethic of justice framework almost exclusively and reasoned primarily in stages four and five on Kohlberg’s hierarchy.

 

Justice or Care? Ethical reasoning of pre-service social studies teachers

Jada Kohlmeier, John W. Saye

Paper presented at the 2011 AERA Conference, New Orleans, LA

Abstract

The authors explored the ethical reasoning of twenty seven pre-service teachers in the first course of a four course social studies education program. The students discussed two historically analogous cases that focused on one of the four values: consent of the governed, general welfare, property, and morality. The authors were interested in exploring whether the students used an ethic of justice or care in their reasoning, particularly if gender was a factor in the ethic used. The results indicated that it was the case, rather than gender, that influenced the ethic used and that students of both genders were able to use both ethics. However, the most prevalent ethic was the ethic of justice.
 

Using digital resources to facilitate professional practice and community among elementary social studies teacher educators

Thomas Brush, John W. Saye

Paper presented at the 2010 CUFA Conference, Denver, CO

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to discuss strategies for using online digital resources (e.g., video cases of effective teaching practices, online instructional activities, synchronous and asynchronous discussion tools) to support professional practice among social studies teacher educators. This paper will focus on the authors’ experiences integrating a collection of online curriculum resources– the Persistent Issues in History Network (PIHNet – http://pihnet.org)-­‐-­‐ into their teacher education courses, and the potential for expanding the use of these resources to the larger teacher educator community. PIHNet includes a set of web resources to assist elementary and secondary pre-­‐service and in-­‐service social studies teachers implement problem-­‐based inquiry (PBI) activities; these resources are currently being used in several social studies teacher education programs throughout the country. We will describe how teacher educators are using these resources to support PBI practices, and discuss strategies for enhancing communication and collaboration among a broader community of teacher educators who may wish to incorporate PBI practices into their programs.
 

Ethical reasoning of pre-service teachers: justice, care, or both?

Jada Kohlmeier, John W. Saye

Paper presented at the 2010 CUFA Conference, Denver, CO

Abstract

The authors explored the ethical reasoning of twenty-seven pre-service teachers in the first course of a four-course social studies education program. The students discussed two historically analogous cases that focused on one of the four values: consent of the governed, general welfare, property, and morality. The authors were interested in exploring whether the students used an ethic of justice or care in their reasoning, particularly if gender was a factor in the ethic used. The results indicated that it was the case, rather than gender, that influenced the ethic used and that students of both genders were able to use both ethics. However, the most prevalent ethic was the ethic of justice
 

Historical Dilemmas: Andrew Jackson and the Debate Over Indian Removal

James Howell, John W. Saye

Materials presented at the 2012 NCSS Conference, Seattle, WA
 

Did the Industrial Revolution diminish or improve quality of life?

James Howell, John W. Saye

Materials presented at the 2010 SSCA Conference, Birmingham, A
 
 
 

Implementation of a Socioscientific Inquiry Unit in a High School Biology Classroom: A Teacher's Perspective


Thomas Brush, Krista Glazewski, Suhkyung Shin, Sungwon Shin, Jiyoon Jung

Paper will be presented at the 2014 AERA Conference, Philadelphia, PA

Abstract


Socioscientific Inquiry (SSI) represents an instructional approach designed to target interest and knowledge in science. In this context, students consider scientific issues that have social implications and comprise a range of trade-offs, concepts, and considerations in order to arrive at informed conclusions (Sadler, 2011, 2004). Given the potential benefits to students on utilizing SSI within K-12 instruction, it is important to explore the challenges to implementing SSI in authentic classrooms settings. Doing so may provide additional insight into how to better partner with teachers to successfully implement SSI instruction. The purpose of this study was to explore the successes and challenges of a teacher as he designed and implemented a socioscientific inquiry unit in his science classroom for the first time. Specifically, this study addressed the following research questions: (1) What challenges does a teacher with limited experience in SSI have in designing and implementing an SSI unit with his students? (2) What components of the SSI curriculum model does the teacher interpret as more or less crucial in implementing SSI in his classroom? Results and implications for collaborating with teachers in developing SSI curriculum are discussed.

 

SSINet: Design, Development, and Practice of Web- and Mobile-Based Tools to Scaffold Socioscientific Inquiry

Krista Glazewski, Thomas Brush, Jiyoon Jung, Suhkyung Shin, Sungwon Shin

Paper will be presented at the 2014 AERA Conference, Philadelphia, PA

Abstract


In Socioscientific Inquiry (SSI), students consider scientific issues that have social implications and comprise a range of trade-offs and concepts in order to arrive at informed conclusions (Sadler, 2004). Engaging in socioscientific reasoning, however, requires skills and experiences that may be difficult for the learner (Klosterman & Sadler, 2010; Walker, & Zeidler, 2007). Our efforts build on two forms of scaffolding to support learners’ SSI reasoning capabilities: soft and hard scaffolds (Brush & Saye, 2002; Saye & Brush, 2002). Soft scaffolds represent what we typically consider as scaffolds: dynamic, situation-specific aid provided by a teacher or peer. In contrast, hard scaffolds are planned in advance based on typical student difficulties with a task. To support teachers’ scaffolding efforts in SSI, we designed, developed, and implemented a suite of tools, which are hosted and customized from within SSI-Net (http://ssinet.org). In our study, we wanted to know how a teacher used the tools to plan and implement instruction with his 9th grade biology classes. The teacher embraced the new tools and the changes prompted in his practice as a result. Furthermore, he prioritized multiple forms of learner support in his implementation, and imported resources from outside of the SSI-Net tools in order to accomplish three primary scaffolding approaches in support of learners: embedded expertise, forward guidance, and making thinking visible. Understanding more about his type of use both informs future iterations of the tools as well as the needs of teachers when involving their student in problem solving environments that require advanced and complex reasoning.

 

 

Scaffolding for Socioscientific Inquiry in a Secondary Science Classroom: A Case Study

Suhkyung Shin, Thomas Brush, Jiyoon Jun, Krista Glazewski, Sungwon Shin

Paper will be presented at the 2014 AERA Conference, Philadelphia, PA

Abstract


This study explores how hard scaffolding tools support soft scaffolding for implementing a socio-scientific inquiry (SSI) unit in a science classroom. This case study focused on how students used resources and tools during their SSI activities, as well as how students perceived the SSI unit and the scaffolding tools embedded in the SSI activities. This study has implications for how we understand the student experience of scaffolding in science inquiry-based environments, and provides recommendations related to the effective use of hard and soft scaffolding and suggestions for refining scaffolding design to better support teachers’ instructional efforts.

 

 
 
 

The PBL-TECH Project: Web-Based Tools and Resources to Support Problem-Based Learning in Pre-Service Teacher Education


Thomas Brush, Krista Glazewski, Anne Ottenbreit-Leftwich, John W. Saye, Zhizhen Zhang, Sungwon Shin

Paper presented at the 2013 SITE Conference, New Orleans, LA

Abstract


This paper discusses the PBL-TECH project, which seeks to design, disseminate, evaluate, and sustain an enhanced teacher preparation model that provides teacher educators across the United States with web-based tools and resources to teach future teachers to effectively implement innovative technology-supported problem-based learning (PBL) instructional practices, focusing on two specific research-supported PBL models: Problem-Based Historical Inquiry (PBHI) and Socioscientific Inquiry (SSI). Our project focuses on the design and development of web-based tools and resources to support both the modeling of technology-enhanced PBL activities in teacher education, and the exploration of the best methods for integrating technology-supported PBL practices in teacher education. We also provide a discussion of our current and proposed research efforts to explore the most effective ways to implement technology-enhanced PBL in teacher education.

 

PBL-TECH: Using Web 2.0 Tools and Resources to Support Problem-Based Curricular Innovations in Pre-Service Teacher Education

Thomas Brush, Krista Glazewski, Anne Ottenbreit-Leftwich, Sungwon Shin, Suhkyung Shin, Muruvvet Demiral, Ya-Huei Lu, & Mina Min

Paper presented at the 2012 AERA Conference, Vancouver, BC, Canada

 
 
 
     
 
         
Why PBL? PBLTech Tools Communities Research About Us
  Scaffolding Tools PIHNet Project/Research Members
  Authenticity Tools SSINet Partners News
  Collaboration Tools Contact Us
  Web 2.0 Tools      
         
         
Copyright © 2013. PBL Tech. All rights reserved.